Weak facial muscles

Weak facial muscles are common for people just about to experience a stroke and in people post-stroke. This occurs when the nerves that control facial muscles become damaged. Facial palsy is a loss of muscles in a portion of the face while the limbs still function perfectly.

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Nausea

Nausea and vomiting are some of the most common symptoms found in stroke patients. A stroke that occurs in the cerebellum (part of the brain that controls movement) causes abnormal reflexes of the head and upper-body. Nausea generally follows this type of stroke.

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Dizziness

Vertigo and dizziness are triggered by an acute brain stem stroke. Usually, these symptoms do not occur at the same time with partial or facial paralysis. Since headaches are common and can even be triggered by extremely bright lights, even hospitals can misdiagnose it for another illness.

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Numbness

Another common – yet often ignored – symptom of a stroke is numbness. Before an upcoming stroke, a person will most likely lose feeling in one of their arms or legs. Once again, this symptom can be misdiagnosed by medical professionals since it’s common in other conditions which pinch arm or leg nerves.

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Improper balance

Loss of balance occurs right before a stroke and even during or after the recovery process. Balance is commonly impaired by strokes, causing a person to become unsteady or dizzy while moving. As the brain repairs itself, patients can begin to regain their balance.

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Slurred speech

Slurred speech is one of the most common symptoms of an upcoming stroke and post-stroke. This is because stroke victims suffering from facial palsy will lose much of their control over their facial muscles, affecting jaw and tongue movement. Speech therapy can help patients regain their communication skills.

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Sudden severe headaches

A person who suddenly experiences severe headaches or migraines may be at risk of an upcoming stroke. A stroke is when blood vessels in the brain get clogged, depriving the brain of oxygen. Some patients may experience intermittent headaches or migraines even during their recovery.

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Trouble understanding others

Patients will face cognitive challenges after experiencing a stroke. This means that they will have difficulty performing tasks that were once easy. Even understanding someone speaking to you can be a significant challenge since strokes affect attention and concentration abilities.

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Muscles stiffness

Stroke survivors have to go through a number of difficult challenges during their recovery phase. After strokes, patients will experience shots of pain in the joints, making it extremely uncomfortable to move. Muscle tightness is also symptom found in stroke patients.

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Uncontrolled eye movements

Another challenge that stroke survivors have is controlling their eye movements and position. These defects are caused by a disturbance in parts of the brain and nerves that control the eye. These uncontrolled movements include involuntary blinking, winking, and squinting.

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Difficulty swallowing

Survivors will experience difficulty swallowing food and drinks, a condition referred to as dysphagia, immediately after a stroke. Fortunately, this condition heals as time goes by. This is due to a compression of the nerves which control muscles in the face and esophagus.

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Partial paralysis

Paralysis – the muscle’s inability to move – is a common disability following strokes. 90% of survivors have some form of paralysis afflicting their bodies after a stroke. Rehabilitation can help survivors rebuild their muscles and regain voluntary movement, even years after the stroke.

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Blurred vision

Blurred vision and other conditions related to sight are common when a stroke occurs in the right hemisphere of the brain. The visual pathways are impaired, resulting in visual field loss. Other sight-related conditions associated with strokes are double vision, tunnel vision, and even blindness.

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Hiccups

Hiccups are perhaps one of the most innocent annoyances, but it can also be a symptom of stroke. This happens when a stroke impairs the breathing center of the brain. Although hiccups won’t exacerbate your condition post-stroke, survivors may notice chest pain and numbness whenever they hiccup.

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Fever

This is another symptom that is common in a wide assortment of health conditions. In cases of severe strokes, tissue necrosis can cause body temperatures to increase drastically. Fevers and other infections are usually caught by survivors within the first couple of weeks after a stroke.

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